News




April 30, 2022

Senior officers from the Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India, visited Mysuru yesterday and held a closed-door meeting with the top officers of the District at the DC’s Office and discussed the possibility of holding the main International Day of Yoga (IDY)-2022 event in Mysuru, on June 21.

They later visited Mysore Palace, Karnataka Exhibition Grounds and proceeded to the Mysore Race Course.

Inspecting the entire venues and asking for site maps, the officials examined the area, extent, facilities, entrance and exits, security, parking, transportation, nearby accommodation and also the likely weather in June.

The visit comes in the wake of Mysuru-Kodagu MP Pratap Simha and Uttara Kannada MP Ananth Kumar Hegde urging Prime Minister Narendra Modi  to attend the IDY-2022 main event in Mysuru on June 21. As it has been a practice, the PM attends the main IDY event (mass Yoga demonstration) from 7 am to 8 am and this time, the inclination is on choosing Mysuru as the main event venue.

The officers team was led by Vaidya Rajesh Kotecha, Secretary, Ministry of AYUSH, New Delhi. Others in the team were Kavita Garg, Joint Secretary, Ministry of AYUSH and Ramachandra, Commissioner, AYUSH.

They held discussions with the District Administration authorities including DC Dr. Bagadi Gautham, senior officials from Ayush, Police and Deputy Director of Mysore Palace Board T.S. Subramanya.

The media was not allowed to the meeting. This IDY (eighth in a series) will be a grand affair as it is being held after two years of virtual events and this year’s celebrations coincide with Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav. The final decision on the venue will be taken by the officers in New Delhi in consultation with the Prime Minister’s Office that will have a final say in PM Modi’s visit and security clearance.

As it will be a large gathering in case the PMO confirms the visit, the sprawling 139.30-acre  Mysore Race Course is likely to be a preferred venue.

The Race Course can accommodate a large gathering nearing a lakh or so and moreover it has good access roads and not congested. The PMO will prefer such a venue where a security blanket can be thrown on, sources added.



April 29, 2022

Senior officers from the Ministry of Ayush, Government of India, will be visiting Mysuru city today (Apr. 29) to explore the possibility of holding the main event of International Day of Yoga (IDY)-2022 in the surroundings of Mysore Palace or any other suitable venue in Mysuru, on June 21.

The officers will discuss with the officers of Mysuru District Administration and the Police about the possible venue of the event, its accessibility and security measures in case the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) confirms Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Mysuru and take part in the main Yoga Day.

In a communication to Chief Secretary P. Ravi Kumar, Rajesh Kotecha, Secretary, Ministry of Ayush, New Delhi, has mentioned about his visit to Mysuru along with Kavita Garg, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Ayush.

The visit comes in the wake of Mysuru-Kodagu MP Pratap Simha and Uttara Kannada MP Ananth Kumar Hegde urging PM Modi  to attend the IDY-2022 main event in Mysuru on June 21.

“A need was felt to find the feasibility to hold the main event of IDY in Mysuru,” he said, requesting the Chief Secretary to depute senior officers from State Government for a meeting in Mysuru on Apr. 29 at 12 pm. The letter to Chief Secretary was released to media yesterday.

The meeting will focus on the venue for the main mass yoga demonstration, availability of infrastructure, transportation facilities, accommodation, weather, event management, security etc.

Ayush Ministry Secretary has requested the presence of officers from the District Administration along with Police officials as the discussion will be centred around security of venue.

Focus on India branding

He said that the IDY-2022 that is being observed as part of Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav will focus on India branding. “The IDY observation is based on a common yoga protocol demonstration. The main event is a mass yoga demonstration led by the Prime Minister every year from 7 am to 8 am,” Rajesh Kotecha stated in his letter.

IDY-2022 will be the eighth such celebration on June 21 and plans are afoot to make it a massive physical event as it is being held after two years of holding it virtually due to COVID-19. A series of meetings involving Ministers from various Departments has decided to celebrate this year’s IDY with added enthusiasm and vigour.

1,10,000 participants

In his request letter to the PM, Pratap Simha has stated that Mysuru, the birthplace of Ashtanga Yoga, is the perfect location to learn and practise this fairly dynamic form of yoga.  Mysuru has a rich history of contributing to the preservation, development and promotion of yoga practices through the teachings of great personalities like Pattabhi Jois and others. Several renowned yogic scholars and gurus have established bases here and nurtured the art to reach global levels, he stated.



April 29, 2022

This list records each International Day of Yoga from the day’s inception in 2015.

2015

The first International Day of Yoga was observed around the world on 21 June 2015. The Ministry of AYUSH made the necessary arrangements in India. 35,985 people, including Narendra Modi and dignitaries from 84 nations, performed 21 asanas (yoga postures) for 35 minutes at Rajpath in New Delhi. The day was observed by millions across the world. NCC cadets entered the Limca Book of Records for the “largest yoga performance simultaneously by a single uniformed youth organisation” by performing at multiple venues.

The event at Rajpath established two Guinness world records awarded to the Ministry of AYUSH, and received by the minister Shripad Yesso Naik. They were for the largest yoga class, of 35,985 people, and for the largest number of participating nationalities (84 nations). In San Francisco, 5,000 participants gathered in the Marina Green park to practice yoga.

2016

The second International Day of Yoga was held around the theme, ‘Connect with Youth’ to engage and seek participation from the younger audience. The Prime Minister led a mass yoga demonstration held at Chandigarh, where more than 30,000 people participated. Performance of yoga by 150 Divyang Jan along with the Prime Minister was one of the highlights. Around the world, 192 United Nation Member States observed IDY- 2016.

2017

In Lucknow, the Indian prime minister Narendra Modi participated in the event and practiced yoga along with 51,000 participants. Many business leaders in India also took part in the event. In New York, thousands of participants gathered to practice yoga on Times Square. Japan created a Parliamentary League for the promotion of yoga just prior to the event, in April 2017. In China, the largest gathering was 10,000 participants in the city of Wuxi. In Athens, the event took place on 25 June as part of the Greek Open Yoga Day and in, the event happened on 18 June and gathered a few hundred participants. In Ireland, participants met in the round room of the . The theme for 2017 was “Yoga for Health“.

2018

The event in Dehradun was held at the Forest Research Institute. PM Modi led an estimated 50,000 volunteers to mark the fourth anniversary of International Yoga Day. The theme for 2018 was “Yoga for Peace“. Over 100,000 people gathered at a yoga session in Kota, Rajasthan and performed yoga together, earning the city a Guinness World Record.

2019

5th International Yoga Day was celebrated zealously in various parts of India. The main event was held in Ranchi and the prime minister of India, Narendra Modi led a crowd of over 40,000 people, who attended this event there. The theme of this year’s event was “Yoga for Heart“. At this event, the prime minister addressed the people of India, stressing upon the importance of Yoga for the overall health of body, mind, society, and even our climate, saying “Let our motto be – Yoga for peace, harmony, and progress”. He also said that the government would be working to make Yoga a pillar of the ‘preventive healthcare and wellness’ system.

2020

The theme for the 2020 day is “Yoga at Home and Yoga with Family“. The Bulgarian prime minister Boyko Borissov recorded a video message to Indian prime minister Narendra Modi on the occasion of International Yoga Day.

2021

The theme for the 2021 day is “Yoga for well-being“. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Indian mission to the United Nations organized an online celebration on UN WebTV in place of face-to-face yoga events.



April 28, 2022

Addiction fundamentally changes the way a person’s mind and body works. Priorities change and self-care is often neglected in favor of substance abuse. Recovery not only focuses on helping a person rid themselves of the mind and mood-altering effects of drugs and alcohol, but also prioritizes helping a person obtain a sense normal functioning. There are numerous tools utilized through the course of recovery to help achieve this, and yoga and meditation can be fundamental in achieving this both early in recovery and throughout the entire journey.

Addiction can be largely fueled by mental and emotional experiences. Self-medication is common and substances are often used as a means of escape from the stresses of daily life. Without the ability to use drugs and alcohol, a person in treatment must learn new, healthy ways to cope with the inevitable difficulties they will eventually face. Yoga and meditation provide an avenue for releasing tension and stress while strengthening the mind and body. The benefits of yoga and meditation improve recovery outcomes and help establish behaviors that support sobriety throughout life.

YOGA

There are countless approaches to yoga that can suit anyone. Even beginners can find benefits through breathing exercises, movement sequences, and postures designed to stretch and strengthen the body. Some of the benefits of yoga many people experience include:

  • Increased flexibility
  • Improved strength
  • Muscle toning
  • Weight loss
  • Increased energy levels
  • Improved respiration and circulatory health
  • Strengthened athletic ability

Yoga can help relieve pain from some chronic conditions including back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and headaches. It is also known to reduce blood pressure and insomnia. Many find that yoga can help relieve stress as well and improve mental clarity. Through focused breathing and concentration, body awareness improves helping many people become more aware of their physical and mental needs.

Yoga is often coupled with meditation because it helps relax the mind and encourages participants to redirect their thoughts. In recovery, especially early on, the experience of withdrawal and learning to come to terms with sobriety can leave many struggling with mental and emotional difficulty. By focusing inward, calming the mind, and become more aware of oneself, meditation can help improve mood and reduce stress levels.

MEDITATION

Meditation has numerous benefits that helps many overcome stressors and triggers that can cause relapse. Some of these benefits include:

  • Reduced stress levels
  • Less anxiety
  • Increased self-awareness
  • Improved attention span
  • Improved quality of sleep
  • Reduced pain
  • Decreased blood pressure

Specifically, in addiction recovery, meditation can improve control over impulses and thoughts that trigger addictive behaviors. Meditation can help strengthen willpower, control compulsions, and allow people to have a better understanding about how their thoughts and emotions can drive addiction. Because meditation requires a person to redirect their thoughts, many find that they are able to reduce the impulses that drive dependencies and habits.

While yoga and meditation alone will not stop addiction, it can provide many with the tools needed to strengthen their experiences in recovery. Many people find early in recovery that they have much more time on their hands. Cutting off relationships with substance-abusing peers and no longer having substance abuse as a means of occupying their time can leave many people experiencing boredom, anxiety, and other emotions that can trigger relapse. The development of healthy interests and activities can help pass the time and motivate those in treatment.

Yoga and meditation promote physical and mental health in a way that improves recovery outcomes. Not only does it help restore a person’s connection with their inner self, but it also helps them restore relationships with others. Improved mental and physical functioning can help provide the clarity of mind needed to focus on the most important aspects of recovery. It can help restore a sense of identity that enables a person to move forward in developing a life not dependent on the use of substances to feel normal. Best of all, it can be practiced anywhere at any time, alone or in groups, allowing a person to make time to self-reflect and become part of a supportive community.



April 25, 2022
What is Pranayama Yoga?

Prana is the Sanskrit word for ‘breath’ and Yama means ‘control’. As the name suggests, pranayama is the practice of controlling your breathing pattern in order to improve your physical and mental well-being. It involves inhaling, exhaling and holding your breath for a variety of different time intervals to remove carbon dioxide from your body and improve the flow of oxygen to the brain cells. This results in enhanced memory, focus and other cognitive abilities. People perform pranayama in conjunction with yoga poses, to reap better results from them. Any good yoga guru will, therefore, guide you on the breathing pattern for every asana he demonstrates.

How can I practice Pranayama yoga?

Pranayama is good for everyone irrespective of their age, but for some people, it’s all the more helpful. Those suffering from high blood pressure, for example, can greatly benefit from practising Pranayama regularly. By regulating your breath, you can lower your blood pressure. Moreover, Pranayama is a highly effective tool to lose weight. The increased supply of oxygen to your muscles boosts your metabolic rate, resulting in faster fat burn. There are various ways of doing pranayama. Mentioned below are some of the most popular ones:

Natural breathing

Natural breathing is the first step of pranayama. It involves becoming aware of your natural breath – and observing everything from its depth to its temperature. Without this awareness, you wouldn’t have the knowledge about which part of your breathing process requires more work.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete focus to your breath.
  • Become aware of the air entering your nostrils – whether it becomes smoother or deeper when it enters your lung, and how hot/cold it is when you exhale.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Basic abdominal breathing

Abdominal breathing has to be practised for a few minutes before pranayama to increase the flow of oxygen and nutrients to all your muscles and relieve spasms and stiffness if any. Thanks to the modern lifestyle, not many people take breaths as deep as this practice requires. But once they start doing it, they realize just how beneficial it is.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Place your right palm on your chest and your left palm, on your stomach.
  • Take a deep breath in. As you do this, your diaphragm should push downwards and make your belly pop out.
  • Exhale slowly. As you do this, your diaphragm should move upward to its original position and make your belly go back inside.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Thoracic breathing

Unlike abdominal breathing, thoracic breathing requires shifting the focus to your chest and observing how the air you inhale travels in your lung before it’s blown out. It’s more focused on the movement of the ribcage, as opposed to the stomach. This is an effective way to increase lung capacity and release stiffness in the neck, upper back and other parts of the upper body.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Place one palm on your chest.
  • Take a deep breath in. As you do this, your ribcage should expand outwards.
  • Breathe out slowly and let your ribcage return to its original position.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Clavicular breathing

Clavicular breathing is usually paired with thoracic breathing, for they both focus on the movement of the chest. However, their technicalities are slightly different. Clavicular breathing goes one step further than thoracic breathing by not only requiring you to expand and contract your ribcage as you breathe in and out respectively, but also moving your upper chest and shoulders slightly upward to make room for more air to enter. This is great in moments of high stress and anxiety.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Place one palm on your chest.
  • Take a deep breath in. As you do this, your ribcage should expand outwards and slightly upwards.
  • Breathe out slowly and let your ribcage return to its original position.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Yogic breathing

Yogic breathing is an amalgamation of abdominal, thoracic and clavicular breathing. It involves expanding both your abdomen and chest, in that order, to make room for as much oxygen to flow in your system as possible. However, the practice has to feel smooth and seamless, avoiding any jerks and strains.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Take a deep breath in. Firstly, your abdomen should expand to its full capacity, followed by your chest and then finally, there should be a slight upward movement of your collar bones.
  • When you exhale, first relax your collar bones, then your chest and finally your abdomen.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Deep breathing with ratios

Deep breathing, as a foundation, requires you to focus on the movement of your abdomen and chest when you breathe. As you inhale, the abdomen and chest should move outward and as you exhale, they should go back in. At the same time, you have to time your inhalations and exhalations. You can start with 2:2 seconds, and then go up to 3:3 and 4:4. Once you’re comfortable with this count, you can prolong your exhalations and try a 4:6 or 4:8.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Breathe in for four seconds. Let your abdomen and chest expand as you do this.
  • Breathe out for four seconds. Relax your abdomen and chest as you do this.
  • Continue this for a few minutes.
Fast breathing

Fast breathing helps throw all the toxins out of your body and gives a massage to your lungs, heart and digestive organs, thus making them stronger and more efficient. There are various ways to perform fast breathing: You can close one nostril and breathe in and out of the other, or simply alternate between your two nostrils. It’s good to do a combination of them all.

Follow these steps:

  • Sit down on the floor in a comfortable position.
  • Keep your back straight and shoulders relaxed.
  • Gently close your eyes.
  • Turn your complete attention to your breath.
  • Breathe in through your left nostril, and breathe out from the right.
  • Now breathe in through your right nostril, and breathe out from the left.
  • Continue this in a fast motion for a few minutes.


April 20, 2022

With its emphasis on breathing practices and medita­tion—both of which help calm and center the mind— it’s hardly surprising that yoga also brings mental benefits, such as reduced anxiety and depression. What may be more surprising is that it actually makes your brain work better.

A sharper brain

When you lift weights, your muscles get stronger and bigger. When you do yoga, your brain cells develop new connections, and changes occur in brain struc­ture as well as function, resulting in improved cog­nitive skills, such as learning and memory. Yoga strengthens parts of the brain that play a key role in memory, attention, awareness, thought, and language. Think of it as weightlifting for the brain.

Studies using MRI scans and other brain imaging technology have shown that people who regularly did yoga had a thicker cerebral cortex (the area of the brain responsible for information processing) and hippocampus (the area of the brain involved in learn­ing and memory) compared with nonpractitioners. These areas of the brain typically shrink as you age, but the older yoga practitioners showed less shrinkage than those who did no yoga. This suggests that yoga may counteract age-related declines in memory and other cognitive skills.

Research also shows that yoga and meditation may improve executive functions, such as reasoning, decision making, memory, learning, reac­tion time, and accuracy on tests of mental acuity.

Improved mood

All exercise can boost your mood by lowering levels of stress hormones, increasing the production of feel-good chemicals known as endorphins, and bringing more oxygenated blood to your brain. But yoga may have additional ben­efits. It can affect mood by elevating levels of a brain chemical called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is associated with better mood and decreased anxiety.

Meditation also reduces activity in the limbic system—the part of the brain dedicated to emotions. As your emotional reac­tivity diminishes, you have a more tempered response when faced with stressful situations.

Drugs and talk therapy have traditionally been the go-to remedies for depression and anxiety. But complementary approaches, such as yoga, also helps, and yoga stacks up well when compared with other complementary therapies.

A number of small studies have found that yoga can help with post-traumatic stress dis­order (PTSD). It is not used by itself, but as an add-on treatment to help reduce intrusive memories and emo­tional arousal and to produce calmer, steadier breathing. Deep, slow breathing is associated with calmer states because it helps activate the parasympathetic nervous system.

Content: Harvard Health Publishing



April 15, 2022

From maintaining a healthy posture and increasing metabolism to decreasing fatigue, resting heart rate and stress levels, Yoga is packed with health benefits and is also effective in boosting stamina on physical, physiological and mental levels. Yoga can make one’s cardiovascular and respiratory systems more efficient by improving aerobic and anaerobic endurance.

Are you usually out of breath while completing daily tasks or workouts or during any aerobic/anaerobic activity? Here are 5 Yoga asanas to boost you stamina, improve your endurance and make you persevere longer or help sustain exercise for a prolonged period of time.

1. Naukasana/Navasana or boat pose

Method: Sit on the floor with your legs spread straight in front of you. Keeping your spine erect and hands resting beside your hips, bend your knees and lean back slightly. Now inhale and lift both legs up while extending your hands forward. Keep your toes at eye level and lengthen your spine. Hold the pose for 5 to 10 seconds and release the posture.

Benefits: Yoga’s Naukasana or boat pose not only beats stress but can also row you out of many issues that your body maybe undergoing. It helps strengthen the core and hip flexors, strengthens and improves flexibility in the hip joints and legs, stimulates abdominal organs and improves digestion while also improving the steadiness of the body.

Naukasana helps in regulating blood flow at sugar level and strengthens the abdominal muscles. It improves the health of all organs in the abdomen, especially the liver, pancreas and kidneys and also strengthens the muscles of the arms, thighs and shoulders.

2. Balasana or Child Pose

Method: Sit on your heels on the floor or a yoga mat and keep your knees either together or wide apart. Slowly, exhale and bend forward to touch the floor with your forehead or rest it on a block or two stacked fists while keeping your arms alongside your body and palms facing up.

Alternatively, you can keep your palms facing down on the mat by reaching out your arms towards the front of the yoga mat. Now, if your knees are together, gently press your chest on the thighs or press your chest between the thighs if the knees are apart.

Relax the shoulders, jaw and eyes and find a comfortable place for the forehead as there is an energy point at its center, in between the eyebrows, that supports a “rest and digest” response by stimulating the vagus nerve. Hold onto the pose for as long as you like and pull your navel towards your spine while inhaling and softening your body and the arms while exhaling. Return to the sitting position on the heels slowly while inhaling and as if uncurling the spine.

Benefits: This beginner’s Yoga pose not only helps to reduce stress and anxiety by helps releasing the tension in the chest, back and shoulders but also helps if you have a bout of dizziness or fatigue during the day or during your workout. It can help relieve back pain as it is a gentle stretch for the back, hips, thighs and ankles.

Precautions: This exercise is not recommended for pregnant women or those suffering from diarrhea or knee injury.

3. Setubhandhasana/Setu Bandha Sarvangasana or the Bridge pose

Method: Lie down on your back with legs straight on the floor, palms beside your thighs. Bend both your knees while keeping the legs and hips apart and bring the heels closer to the hips.

Inhale and lift your stomach and chest up by taking your hips off the floor. Give support to your lower back with your hands. Now straighten your legs with your toes pointing in the front. Hold this position for 10 to 15 seconds and release.

Benefits: This variation also known as the Bridge pose stretches the chest, neck and spine. It not only strengthens the back, buttock and hamstrings but also increases blood circulation, alleviates stress and calms the brain.

4. Ustrasana or camel pose

Method: Kneel know on the Yoga mat and keep your knees and feet together. Lean in the backward direction by pushing your hips in the forward direction.

Bend your head and the spine as backward and farther as possible without straining. Rest your hands on your feet, relax your body and the muscles of your back, hold onto the position for a few seconds before releasing.

Benefits: From stretching and strengthening the shoulders and back to opening up the hips and stretching deep hip flexors, Ustrasana not only improves respiration by opening up the chest but also improves digestion and elimination by expanding the abdominal region. It loosens up the vertebrae, relieves lower back pain, improves posture and reduces fat on thighs.

5. Padmasana or lotus pose

Method: Kneel know on the Yoga mat and keep your knees and feet together. Lean in the backward direction by pushing your hips in the forward direction.

Bend your head and the spine as backward and farther as possible without straining. Rest your hands on your feet, relax your body and the muscles of your back, hold onto the position for a few seconds before releasing.

Benefits: From stretching and strengthening the shoulders and back to opening up the hips and stretching deep hip flexors, Ustrasana not only improves respiration by opening up the chest but also improves digestion and elimination by expanding the abdominal region. It loosens up the vertebrae, relieves lower back pain, improves posture and reduces fat on thighs.